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#1 2020-08-19 14:15:16

Quinton018
Member
From: Germany, Germering
Registered: 2020-08-19
Posts: 1

By Jim Grey (about)    It’s a foregone conclusion that my company will keep us working from home through the end of the year.
There’s no compelling reason to go back.
We are delivering as well now as we did before mid-March, when the office closed.
But more importantly, no amount of office safety precautions can eliminate our risk of the virus.
A group of voices in our industry has said for years that we would all be more productive and have a superior work-life balance if we all worked from home.
Now that we’re all working from home and it’s basically working, they are crowing victory.
I say, not so fast.
We’ve been at this only four months, not long enough yet to be sure.
Let’s see how we feel in mid-November when it’s been another four months.
Given the virus’s resurgence, it doesn’t seem far fetched that this could last even longer than that.
Let’s see how we feel at the one year mark, four months later in March.
A software engineer on my team said to me recently, “I really miss everybody.
I wish I could get a group together to go to lunch, like we did every day in the office.” I miss that, too.
I used to bring my lunch, but anytime I wanted lunchtime camaraderie I knew I’d find some group of engineers going out, and I’d be welcome to join them.
Many of those engineers are on projects I’m not involved with and I haven’t seen them in months.
He said he especially missed the in-person dynamic of our seven-person team: “I know I see you and the other engineers on the team on Zoom in our daily check-in meeting and in our regular tech discussions, but I miss our energy in the office.
I feel isolated here.” Then he asked, “Do you think it would be possible to get us together, maybe for lunch at some restaurant outside.
If people want more distance than that, maybe we could all bring our lunch to a big park?”    I checked in with the rest of the team and they were all enthusiastic about getting together, as long as we keep physical distance.
We’ve laid in plans to spend some time together this Thursday, outside, at a place where we can stay spread out.
I also manage the managers of three other teams.
Our four teams work toward common corporate goals, but we’re set up so that each team has its own backlog of work.
It’s efficient.
But part of what makes it work is that in the office we all sit in in adjacent groups of desks.
This is deliberate.
It lets us see each other all the time so we can stay in frequent contact.
It’s been harder since we started working from home.
We’ve done our best to stay in touch, but haven’t found a replacement yet for the random, organic, quick check-ins we were used to.
I’ve noticed an undercurrent of tension growing among the managers.
Recently, there have been a couple spots of friction among them.
We needed to talk things through.

My gut told me we’d be better off meeting in person rather than over Zoom

I asked the managers if they’d be comfortable meeting in a park with masks and good distancing.
After they thought it over for a while they agreed — the benefit outweighed the (mitigated) risk.
We met Thursday afternoon.
We talked through the challenges we’re facing and came up with some collaborative and creative ways to stay aligned, both with each other and with some key peers we work with.
All of the managers told me that it was good to be able to see each other in person, and to read body language as we interacted.
They wished we could do it more often.
The distributed tech companies will all tell you that meeting in person from time to time is essential.
But they tend to do it in big annual or semi-annual whole-company gatherings.
Also.

These companies either built a distributed culture from the start (such as Automattic

which makes WordPress, the software that runs this blog) or shifted to a distributed workforce a long time ago and evolved their culture to fit it.
Companies like mine — most tech companies finding themselves with a COVID-driven at-home workforce — have not completed that evolution, if they’re even trying.
We are used to the dynamics of working together in person.
Several people I work with closely tell me they’re perfectly happy and could keep this up forever.
But the rest of us are still figuring out how to adapt.
I can think of a couple people on my teams who might never fully adapt.
They might need an office environment to work best.
I don’t look for my teams to meet in person regularly.
We are all best off limiting our exposure to people we don’t live with.
But during these summer months we can meet in person if we need to.
There are plenty of wide-open spaces in our city parks, for example.
But what happens when the warm-weather months end.
This is Indiana, after all.
It’s cold in the winter, and we get a lot of snow.
For those of us who feel isolated now, just wait until winter takes away all of our reasonably safe options to connect in person.
All tech companies need to keep intentionally evolving toward more effective ways of working while distributed.
I think it’s a long journey, one that is unlikely to be accomplished in the short term.
I wish us all luck during the long winter.
Originally posted on my personal blog here.
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